Friday October 2nd Takeaways

My first Takeaway was print vs. web. I found an article at http://blog.realmatch.com/trade-publishers/5-advantages-print-advertising/ that has five advantages of using print. One big advantage of print is that it has gravitas, it’s a physical representation of your brand and product, and people like having physical things. According to the article, the MRI Survey of the American Consumer discovered that “influentials”, or people who sway other consumers, can be influenced by print. Another really good advantage of print is that print readers are usually more focused than web users. Web users could have six tabs open and the tv on in the background and could be paying very little attention to your web site, but a person reading your print ad or brochure doesn’t really have those distractions. Sometimes print ads can be better because, since a lot of people are on the web for hours on end, it’s nice to get a break from the screen and look at a print ad. Finally, print ads can get more attention. If you put an ad in the newspaper it will stay there and you can actually chose where to put it and how big you want it. When it comes to ads on the web, your ad will only appear because of a random algorithm and less people will see it.

My second takeaway was pre-flight. The article at http://www.printing.org/news/11277 has tips on how designers can be successful with pre-flight. An important thing to check is the layout; you want to make sure the physical size of the layout matches the specifications and you want to make sure that you created the layout with a professional desktop publishing application. Next, you want to make sure that your fonts are embedded and supplied properly, and that the font is from a valid foundry. Make sure that there is sufficient resolution for the printing method and that the color is RGB and all spot colors are indicated correctly and consistently. Finally, make sure that transparency and special effects are applied correctly and make sure that all layers are setup to print.

My third takeaway was alignment. The article at http://webdesign.tutsplus.com/articles/using-alignment-to-improve-your-designs–webdesign-14501 has examples of how to use alignment to improve designs. When using alignment you want to mix up alignments in your design. This can help to ensure that there is a pattern to your element but also ensure that your design has visual interest. Depending on the content of your design, you need to think about what type of text alignment you want. If you are creating an article, you want want your text to be aligned to the left, or if you are creating a navigation bar, you may want your text to be centered. When aligning images, you need to take the size of the image into consideration. Smaller images are easier to place in content and larger images can break the flow of text in content. One of the best techniques is to center your image inside of the text with padding above and below the image. Finally, background images can be tough to implement, you need to make sure that your image contrasts your text so your text is readable.

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